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Energy Transition Lab

Grand Challenge Course: Pathways to Renewable Energy

November 19, 2015Megan ButlerNews, UncategorizedComments Off on Grand Challenge Course: Pathways to Renewable Energy
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Photo Credit: David Clarke (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Pathways to Renewable Energy

This spring semester at the University of Minnesota Energy Transition Lab Executive Director Ellen Anderson and Engineering Professor Paul Imbertsen are partnering to co-teach a cross-disciplinary course focusing upon renewable energy transition as part of the University’s Grand Challenge Curriculum. The 3 credit course, entitled GCC 3011/5011 Pathways to Renewable Energy, will meet Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 9:45 to 11:00 AM on the East Bank and is open to all University of Minnesota students.

GCC 3011/5011 will closely examine the Realpolitik of energy and the technical, legal, regulatory and policy underpinnings of renewable energy in the United States and Minnesota. Students participating in GCC 3011/5011 will gain an understanding of how political, economic and social structures in the United States and Minnesota bring competing and often contradictory forces to bear upon energy transition. This cross-disciplinary course fulfills honors experience as well as Technology and Society LE theme requirements, and is open to all students. For more information and to register visit z.umn.edu/GRANDCHALLENGE

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The Road to Paris: Multidimensional action to address climate change

October 22, 2015Hari OsofskyEvents, NewsComments Off on The Road to Paris: Multidimensional action to address climate change

All eyes are on Paris as the deadline for negotiation of a new climate change agreement under the auspices of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Conference of the Parties approaches at the end of this year. Whatever those international negotiations deliver, it is unlikely to be a panacea for the problem of climate change. Climate change is increasingly recognized to be a multiscalar, multidimensional problem that will require concerted action across many levels of government and by a range of actors, public and private. Federal action under the newly released Clean Power Plan, local action by cities and states, engagement of corporations and the private sector, and litigation and advocacy by civil society, are all likely to be part of the puzzle in developing effective climate change regulation.

This event, to be held at the University of Minnesota Law School, on Tuesday and Wednesday, October 27-28, 2015, will seek to take stock of multidimensional action to address climate change and its interaction with international efforts to reach a new climate agreement in December in Paris. The workshop is being organized by the Energy Transition Lab and Institute on the Environment at the University of Minnesota, together with the International Environmental Law Interest Group of the American Society of International Law.

The workshop is designed to encourage production of innovative, new scholarship on questions of climate change regulation, with a particular focus on supporting new professionals and young or emerging scholars. Participants will be required to prepare a working draft of their paper for intensive discussion and comment at the workshop.

Agenda

Day 1: October 27, 2015

8:30 – 9:00 am Registration and Breakfast
9:00 – 9:15 am Welcome and Introduction to the Workshop
Hari Osofsky, Professor, University of Minnesota Law School; Faculty Director, Energy Transition Lab; Co-Chair, ASIL International Environmental Law Interest Group
9:15 – 10:15 am Where We Are on the Road to Paris
Group discussion: participants each give brief (2 min or less) views on most important questions and then group brainstorms key issues in negotiations and the broader climate change context.
10:15 – 10:45 am Break
10:45 – 11:35 am State and Local Action to Address Climate Change
Moderator: Kathryn Milun, Associate Professor, Sociology/Anthropology Department, University of Minnesota, Duluth; Founder and Director of the Solar Commons Project

  • Uma Outka, Associate Professor, University of Kansas School of Law
    • Cities and the Low-Carbon Grid
  • Paolo D. Farah, Assistant Professor, West Virginia University, Department of Public Administration & College of Law
    • A Multiscalar and Multilevel Approach to the Role of Non-State Actors and Sub-State Actors in International Environmental Governance and in the Climate Change and Energy Security Discourses
11:40 – 12:30 pm Federalism and the Clean Power Plan
Moderator: Ira Feldman, President & Senior Counsel, greentrack strategies; Lecturer, Masters in Environmental Studies (MES) Program, University of Pennsylvania

  • Melissa Powers, Associate Professor of Law, Lewis & Clark Law School and Amelia Schlusser, Staff Attorney, Green Energy Institute, Lewis & Clark Law School
    • The Risks and Opportunities of a State Measures Approach under the Clean Power Plan
  • Hari Osofsky, Professor, University of Minnesota Law School; Faculty Director, Energy Transition Lab; Co-Chair, ASIL International Environmental Law Interest Group
    • Regional Energy: Bridging the Energy-Environment Divide in the Clean Power Plan
12:30 – 1:35 pm Lunch
1:35 – 2:25 pm U.S. Climate Change and Energy Politics, and the Domestic/International Interface
Moderator: Elizabeth Wilson, Professor of Energy and Environmental Policy and Law, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota

  • Juscelino F. Colares, Schott-van den Eynden Professor of Law, Case-Western Reserve University School of Law
    • Climate Change Mitigation and Trade Rules: The Opportunities and Limitations of Neutral Border Tariffs
  • David A. Wirth, Professor of Law and Director of International Programs, Boston College Law School [remotely at 2pm CST/3pm EDT]
    • The International and Domestic Law of Climate Change: A Binding International Agreement Without the Senate or Congress?
2:30 – 3:20 pm Climate and Energy Federalism
Moderator: Ellen Anderson, Executive Director, Energy Transition Lab

  • David Adelman, Harry Reasoner Regents Chair in Law, Texas Law and David Spence, Professor of Law, Texas Law
    • Cost-Benefit Politics in U.S. Energy Policy
  • Felix Mormann, Associate Professor, Miami School of Law
    • Constitutional Challenges and Regulatory Opportunities for State Climate Policy
3:20 – 3:50 pm Break
3:50 – 4:40 pm Adaptation at Multiple Scales
Moderator: Randel (Randy) D. Hanson, Co-Director, Program in Environment and Sustainability Studies and Coordinator, Sustainable Agriculture Project @ UMD, University of Minnesota, Duluth

  • Jessica J. Hellmann, Russell M. and Elizabeth M. Bennett Chair in Excellence, Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior; Director, Institute on the Environment, University of Minnesota
    • Measuring the “Adaptation Gap” to Inform Adaptation Investment and Track Adaptation Progress Globally
  • Sarah Reiter, Ocean Policy Research Analyst, Monterey Bay Aquarium and Adjunct Faculty, Vermont Law School
    • A Changing Climate, A Coast in Conflict
4:45 – 5:35 pm Transnational Action to Address Climate Change and Its Limits
Moderator: Steve Kelley, Senior Fellow, Center for Science, Technology and Public Policy, Director of Graduate Studies, Master of Science in Security Technologies, Humphrey School of Public Affairs

  • Carlisle Ford Runge, Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Applied Economics and Law, University of Minnesota and James Dorsey, Partner, Frederickson and Byron, Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • Disrupting the Climate in Paris: Creative Destruction and the Global Environmental Logjam
  • Jacqueline Peel, Professor of Law, University of Melbourne; Co-Chair, ASIL International Environmental Law Interest Group
    • A Rights’ Turn Climate Change Litigation?

Day 2: October 28, 2015

8:30 – 9:00 am Breakfast
9:00 – 9:15 am Introduction to Day 2
Jacqueline Peel, Professor of Law, University of Melbourne; Co-Chair, ASIL
International Environmental Law Interest Group
9:15 – 10:05 am Corporate Action to Address Climate Change
Moderator: Jennifer Gunn, Associate Professor, History of Science, Technology & Medicine; Director, Institute of Advanced Studies

  • Shi-Ling Hsu, John W. Larson Professor of Law, Florida State University College of Law
    • Capital Transitioning: The Race from the Bottom and an Alternative Approach to Climate Policy
  • Brett McDonnell, University of Minnesota Law School
    • Energy Divestment/Investment
10:10 – 11:00 am Corporate Action to Address Climate Change
Moderator: Winthrop A. Rockwell, Executive Director, Green Minneapolis

  • Paul M. Vaaler, John and Bruce Mooty Chair in Law & Business Law School & Carlson School of Management
    • Do Stronger Employee Protections in the National Workplace Lead to Higher Rates of Green-Tech Innovation in the Global Marketplace?
  • Lisa Benjamin, Assistant Professor, College of the Bahamas
    • Companies and Climate Change – An Analysis of Five Carbon Major Emitters’ Activities
11:00 – 11:30 am Break
11:30 – 12:20 pm Rethinking Institutional Responses
Moderator: Brad Karkkainen, Henry J. Fletcher Professor in Law, University of Minnesota Law School

  • Todd Aagard, Vice Dean and Professor of Law, Villanova University School of Law [remotely at 11:30 am CST; 12:30 pm EST]
    • Smart Climate Primacy
  • Gabriel Chan, Assistant Professor, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota and Joern Huenteler, Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy Research Group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University
    • Financing Wind Energy Deployment in China through the Clean Development Mechanism
12:20 – 1:30 pm Lunch and Discussion of Next Steps

Heating and Cooling from Sustainable Forestry

October 3, 2015Megan ButlerEvents, NewsComments Off on Heating and Cooling from Sustainable Forestry

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Heating and cooling from sustainable forestry: Can sustainably harvested wood fuel carbon neutral combined heat and power in Minnesota?

Ever-Green Energy has been burning wood waste to provide electricity, heat, and cooling to Downtown Saint Paul for more than 20 years. A handful of other Minnesota communities and industries have similar programs, and have found the strategy to be clean and efficient. Expanding combined heat and power has the potential to improve our energy system – but we must act with care to ensure that wood waste is sourced sustainably and helps, not harms, Minnesota’s rich forestlands.

Join Ever-Green Energy CEO Ken Smith and forestry expert Katie Fernholz of Dovetail Partners to explore the question: How can sustainable forestry power healthier energy – and what should we do, and not do, to achieve a “win win” for our environment.

7:00-7:30AM Registration and Networking Breakfast
7:30-8:00AM Speakers

8:00-8:30AM Engaging discussion

Register here.

Prior to joining District Energy in 2006, Ken Smith worked for over 20 years consulting, designing, and implementing energy projects globally for a variety of industries and led planning and design initiatives with numerous U.S. communities and organizations, with the goal of creating integrated energy infrastructures.

Katie Fernholz’s former positions include chairing the Minnesota Society of American Foresters, membership in the Minnesota Forest Resources Council, and serving on the Boards of Directors for the Minnesota Environmental Partnership and Renewing the Countryside.

This event is part of Fresh Energy’s Power Pairings Breakfast Series. Next up will be Solar for All: How those trying to block rooftop solar are their own worst enemy. November 18th with Jon Wellinghoff, Co-chair, Stoel Rives energy team and immediate past Chairman of FERC and James Tong, Vice President, Strategy and Government Affairs, Clean Power Finance.

Frontiers in the Environment Series: Wednesdays 12:00-1:00PM

October 1, 2015Megan ButlerEvents, NewsComments Off on Frontiers in the Environment Series: Wednesdays 12:00-1:00PM
FRONTIERS_SPRING_BANNER

Frontiers in the Environment: Big Questions

The Frontiers in the Environment series presented by the Institute on the Environment features University of Minnesota experts including Energy Transition Lab Faculty Director Hari Osofsky. The 1 hour presentations are free, open to the public, and do not require registration.

Wednesdays, 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. (see individual talk descriptions for locations)
Free and open to the public; no registration required
Live streaming of the event will now be served up using WebEx. Before you begin, follow the WebEx Instructions.
Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626

This article was first published by Institute on the Environment


September 30 — Should we eat meat?

Frontiers September 30 – Should We Eat Meat?
Photo by Flickr: Mark Peters Photography (Flickr/Creative Commons)

Todd Reubold, Director of Communications, Institute on the Environment, and Director, Ensia; David Tilman, IonE Resident Fellow and Professor in the College of Biological Sciences; Tracey Deutsch, Professor, College of Liberal Arts; and Katie Kasner, RD, LD, Nutritionist/Health Coach Boynton Health Service

Meat production and consumption have been blamed for everything from deforestation and increased greenhouse gas emissions to water pollution and disease transmission. Yet environmental groups and individuals who will gladly admonish you to switch your light bulbs, buy green power and drive less to save the planet, are remarkably tight-lipped when it comes to talking about what to eat. And, ironically, as we’re hearing more about the downsides of meat, carnivores have dug in their heels, promulgating protein-rich paleo diets and patronizing upscale charcuteries. This panel discussion will delve into the science, nutrition, history and future of meat production and consumption. We’ll explore questions such as: What is the impact of global meat production on the environment? What can past historical trends regarding meat consumption teach us about the future? What are the pros and cons of consuming animal products? Why do some people forgo meat? And why do others refuse to? What, if anything, is the “right” thing to do, and why?

IonE Seminar Room R380, Learning & Environmental Sciences Bldg., St. Paul

Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626


October 7 –– Why do we need community solar?

Frontiers October 7 – Why do we need community solar?
Photo by Flickr: Windwärts Energie
(Flickr/Creative Commons)

Kathryn Milun, IonE Resident Fellow and Professor, University of Minnesota Duluth College of Liberal Arts

We have recently seen solar energy become competitive with natural gas for electricity production in the U.S. This places us at a tipping point for solar to transform the U.S. energy landscape over the next few years. What will this solar landscape look like? Is our current system of large-scale utilities sufficient to take advantage of this window of opportunity to make solar a key tool in the transition to renewable energy production? What does community solar add to this transition? Who defines what community solar is and for what purposes? Milun will explore these questions and the role of community solar in the big picture of solar energy production, providing examples from her fieldwork in Arizona and Minnesota as founder and director of the Solar Commons, a community solar project that won a U.S. Green Building Council award.

IonE Seminar Room R380, Learning & Environmental Sciences Bldg., St. Paul

Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626


October 14 — How can spatial thinking solve environmental grand challenges?

Frontiers October 18 – How can spatial thinking solve environmental grand challenges?
Photo by Flickr: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
(Flickr/Creative Commons)

Steven Manson, IonE Resident Fellow and Professor in the College of Liberal Arts

In this talk we will describe how the Institute on the Environment and University of Minnesota are global leaders in spatial scholarship and education for meeting environmental grand challenges. We’ll provide an overview of the fast-increasing importance of spatial thinking across the humanities, policy realms, and social, natural and information sciences. We will discuss spatial research, teaching and service on campus, and showcase exciting projects that use spatial data, analysis, visualization and thinking to address environmental grand challenges. We will draw on work from almost every college on campus, with special emphasis on work at IonE.

IonE Seminar Room R380, Learning & Environmental Sciences Bldg., St. Paul

Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626


October 21 — Can we save biodiversity from climate change?

Frontiers October 21 – Can we save biodiversity from climate change?
Photo by Flickr: CIFOR
(Flickr/Creative Commons)

Jessica Hellmann, Director, Institute on the Environment, and Russell M. and Elizabeth M. Bennett Chair in Excellence, College of Biological Sciences

Conservation biology is charged with deploying science to stem the tide of biodiversity loss. It’s a relatively young field, yet it has many established paradigms and protocols for dealing with problems such as habitat loss and degradation, invasive species, and over-harvesting. A new threat is building steam, however: climate change. Even if global carbon emissions slow and eventually decline, climate change is expected to be a dominant force molding species distributions and ecosystem composition in the coming decades. With its global scope and ubiquitous effects, climate change is unlike many other environmental factors, and some of our most prized conservation strategies might not be up to the task. This Frontiers talk will explore some of the unique features of climate change from the perspective of biodiversity conservation — features that invite us to consider new conservation tools that must be evaluated scientifically as well as economically and ethically. As a bonus, the talk will expand from a biodiversity focus to broader questions about the goals and purposes of the IonE form the perspective of its new director.

Location to be announced.

Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626


October 28 — How should we “green” our most vulnerable communities?

Frontiers October 28 – How should we green our most vulnerable communities?
Photo by Flickr: Alan Greig
(Flickr/Creative Commons)

Bonnie Keeler, Lead Scientist, Natural Capital Project; Kate Derickson, Professor, College of Liberal Arts; and Kenya McKnight Ahad, Met Council Transportation Advisory Board

The environmental justice movement has drawn attention to the impacts of pollution and dis-amenities (factories, roads) on low income and traditionally marginalized populations in urban areas. These communities face a triple whammy of risks: the people who live there are more vulnerable, they live in lower quality housing, and they are located in areas with greater environmental risks and greater exposure to pollution. For people in these communities, the environment may seem like a liability rather than an asset. Urban streams are sometimes polluted or filled with garbage and crime can cause parks to be perceived as places to avoid rather than recreational amenities. At the same time, trees provide shade reducing energy costs and gardens, parks and green spaces offer cultural and aesthetic value. In this panel, we will explore the evidence for links between urban nature and the health and well-being of urban residents — both positive and negative — and what this means for the greening of neighborhoods in the Twin Cities. We will also hear from community leaders about successes and challenges associated with infrastructure costs, green housing, urban redevelopment and the equitable distribution of nature in the city.

IonE Seminar Room R380, Learning & Environmental Sciences Bldg., St. Paul

Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626


November 4 — Can hybrid cooperation make Arctic offshore drilling safer?

Frontiers November 4 – Can hybrid cooperation make Arctic offshore drilling safer?
Photo by Flickr: U.S. Department of Defense Current Photos
(Flickr/Creative Commons)

Hari Osofsky, IonE Resident Fellow, Faculty Director of the Energy Transition Lab and Professor in the Law School

The rapid pace of Arctic melting has made the region’s massive oil and gas resources increasingly accessible. The Obama Administration’s 2015 decision to issue proposed rules for Arctic offshore oil and gas exploration and to provide conditional approval of Shell Oil’s Chukchi Sea drilling plans reinforce the Arctic as an expanding frontier. In this talk we will explore how “hybrid cooperation” can serve as a critical tool for addressing these regulatory and governance challenges. In this form of cooperation, diverse stakeholders at multiple levels of government intertwine their efforts, either through creating institutions that bring them together or through integrating each other’s work in the agreements and regulations they develop. The talk will examine examples at transnational, national and subnational levels of cooperation and explore their benefits and limitations. These instances serve as important examples of possible pathways forward in this context and other complex governance contexts.

IonE Seminar Room R380, Learning & Environmental Sciences Bldg., St. Paul

Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626


November 11 — When does conservation mean killing?

Frontiers November 11 – When does conservation mean killing?
Photo by Flickr: Macroscopic Solutions
(Flickr/Creative Commons)

Julia Ponder, Executive Director, Raptor Center and Assistant Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine

Invasive species are a global issue with direct impacts on biodiversity. Protecting biodiversity through conservation can be an inexact science and a dirty proposition in a race against time — a high stakes contest to save species, protect populations and preserve biodiversity. With these high stakes come ethical questions. This presentation will explore: When is it right to kill one species to protect another? Do the ends justify the means? What is an acceptable level of knowledge for taking action in a world of data gaps and limited resources? What actions are justified in the name of conservation and protection of biodiversity? Who picks the winners and the losers?

IonE Seminar Room R380, Learning & Environmental Sciences Bldg., St. Paul

Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626


November 18 — Are robots a boon or a bust in scientific research?

Frontiers November 18 – Are robots a boon or a bust in scientific research?
Photo by Flickr: Flou-net”
(Flickr/Creative Commons)

Volkan Isler, IonE Resident Fellow and Associate Professor, College of Science and Engineering; and Mark Ditmer, Postdoctoral Researcher, College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

Robots are increasingly being put to scientific purposes. Autonomous aerial, ground and surface vehicles are used to assess fertilizer levels in cornfields and yield estimates for apple orchards. They are also being used in a variety of wildlife management and conservation situations, such as monitoring invasive fish and tracking free-roaming wildlife. A recent study, however, found bears to have an adverse reaction to drones in their environment. In this presentation, we will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of this evolving technology.

IonE Seminar Room R380, Learning & Environmental Sciences Bldg., St. Paul

Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626


December 2 — Does competition promote planet-saving innovation?

Frontiers December 2 – Does competition promote planet-saving innovation?
Photo by National Renewable Energy Lab
(Flickr/Creative Commons)

Alfred Marcus, Professor, Edson Spencer Endowed Chair in Strategy and Technological Leadership, Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship, Carlson School of Management, and Author, Innovations in Sustainability: Food and Fuel

Can competition between companies encourage innovations in sustainability that have the potential to solve some of the world’s grand challenges? Using a series of case studies from his recent book, Innovations in Sustainability, Marcus will examine the progress, obstacles, competition and evolution of sustainable innovations in such companies as Tesla, General Motors, Toyota, General Mills, Kellogg, Whole Foods and Walmart, reflecting on lessons learned and shedding light on the challenges that lie ahead.

IonE Seminar Room R380, Learning & Environmental Sciences Bldg., St. Paul

Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626


December 9 — Can energy use data reduce electricity costs and environmental impacts?

Frontiers December 9 – Can energy use data reduce electricity costs and environmental impacts?
Photo by National Nuclear Security Administration
(Flickr/Creative Commons)

Alexandra Klass, IonE Resident Fellow and Distinguished McKnight University Professor, Law School; and Elizabeth Wilson, IonE Resident Fellow and Professor, Humphrey School of Public Affairs

As state and local governments and electricity users attempt to improve the efficiency of their buildings, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and realize the promises of improved demand-side management of energy resources, the need for electricity and other energy-related data becomes ever more pressing. Yet current law allows companies to keep a significant amount of energy use data confidential. In this talk we will draw lessons from the more sophisticated legal frameworks governing health care, education and environmental emissions data that balance public policy needs for data evaluation with privacy interests. A review of the law in these fields shows that the privacy and confidentiality interests in energy consumption data may be overstated and, in any event, can be adequately addressed in most instances by aggregating the data, using historic rather than current data, or developing contracts and other agreements to ensure security where access to individualized data is needed.

Location to be announced.

Join us online via WebEx. Meeting Number: 741 108 626

Poverty and Environment Fund (PEF) - The Biodiversity Corridor program involves K’ho natives like Cil Yu Ha Vuong, 72, who patrols the forests along with fellow community members. He remembers the old life they used to live before the implementation of the ADB-funded project. “In the past, we had a difficult life. We depended on slash-and-burn agriculture, clearing the forest, farming a spot for two years, and then shifting to another spot. We didn’t have enough food to eat.” Alternative incomes offered by the program have enabled them to pursue non-destructive forms of livelihood. (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) Photo Credit: Asian Development Bank (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

 

Energy Innovation in Germany: New Business Models and Integrated Urban Redevelopment

September 22, 2015Megan ButlerEvents, NewsComments Off on Energy Innovation in Germany: New Business Models and Integrated Urban Redevelopment

In October the Energy Transition Lab is co-sponsoring a public forum entitled “Energy Innovation in Germany: New Business Models and Integrated Urban Redevelopment.” The forum will involve energy policy leaders from Minnesota and Germany. Join city planners U. Carstensen and J. Aengenvoort of NextKraftwerke and a group of Minnesota energy policy experts for an exciting conversation!

When: Monday, Oct. 12, 3:00-5:00 PM
Where: Cowles Auditorium, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, U of M
Cost: free and open to the public

Register Today
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Climate Policy, Law and Science Lecture Series

September 17, 2015Megan ButlerEvents, NewsComments Off on Climate Policy, Law and Science Lecture Series

This semester, a lecture series featuring a group of local climate policy experts and advocates will be hosted by the Climate Change and Energy Law, Science and Policy course taught by Energy Transition Lab Executive Director Ellen Anderson and State Representative Melissa Hortman.

The lecture series is open to the public and will be held in Anderson Hall 330 on the University of Minnesota’s West Bank. Lectures will be held from 4:50 until 5:55 on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. A full list of featured speakers is featured below.  Read more →

Climatologist Mark Seeley will be presenting on the science of climate change in Minnesota September 10th at 5:00 PM

September 9, 2015Megan ButlerEvents, NewsComments Off on Climatologist Mark Seeley will be presenting on the science of climate change in Minnesota September 10th at 5:00 PM

 

University of Minnesota Professor and Extension Climatologist Mark Seeley will be giving a presentation entitled “Climate Change in Our Own Backyards:  A Look at What’s Happening in Minnesota” on the science of climate change in Minnesota this Thursday September 10th at 5:00PM.

The presentation will be hosted by the Climate Change and Energy Law, Science and Policy course taught by Energy Transition Lab Executive Director Ellen Anderson and State Representative Melissa Hortman.

The lecture is open to the public and will be held in Anderson Hall 330 on the University of Minnesota’s West Bank. There is space for 50 additional participants in the classroom. However, the presentation will take place as a regular class meeting and available seating will prioritize enrolled students.  Read more →

Nominations open for Midwest Energy News 40 under 40 awards program

August 10, 2015Megan ButlerNews1

The Energy Transition Lab is a proud partner of Midwest Energy News’ recently-launched 40 under 40 awards program. This exciting new award seeks to highlight emerging leaders throughout the Midwest, who are working to accelerate America’s transition to a clean energy economy.

Are you, or do you know, a strong emerging leader who fits that description?

Please consider nominating him or her today.

Eligible innovators may come from all sectors—government, nonprofit, business, regulatory, academic, advocacy, and industry. And, of course, they must be under 40 years old. Nominations will be accepted until 10:00 CT on Monday, August 17th

This is an exciting opportunity to highlight the great people doing great work. Let’s show the depth of leadership here in Minnesota.

40 Under 40

2015 Energy Storage Summit Videos and Presentations

August 5, 2015Megan ButlerFeatured, NewsComments Off on 2015 Energy Storage Summit Videos and Presentations

 

The 2nd Energy Storage Summit Will Be Held in Fall, 2016.

Stay Tuned for more details 

 

What People Are Saying About The Energy Storage Summit:

    • “Leaving the summit I had my interest peaked and had new resources to look for information”
    • “Let’s form a partnership among the key stakeholders, and roll our sleeves and get to work. How about making MN the leader in Midwest storage?”

Read More

    Additional Feedback:

     

    • “Good review of what is real and what is 5-10 years away in regards to energy storage”
    • “Speakers represented a good range of stakeholders
    • Overall, great content”
    • “[I liked] the way questions were handled and holding the presentations to their allotted time”
    • “It was fun at the end to do the live polling and then to network at the reception afterwards”
    • “[I liked] the real time gathering of our opinion using the [Poll Everywhere] technology, as a result we were engaged much better”
    • “Hopefully there will be a follow up session”

Janice Lin Keynote Speaker of the Energy Storage Summit at the University of Minnesota Law School on July 15, 2015 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. © Tony Nelson

Janice Lin Keynote Speaker of the Energy Storage Summit © Tony Nelson

The Energy Transition Lab held a summit on July 15 at which national and local experts examined the policy, technology, regulatory, and market drivers that affect energy storage in Minnesota. Click here to view a list of presenters for the energy storage summit.

Summit participants from a variety of sectors convened to network and participate in a high level discussion about the future of energy storage in the state. Of the more than 200 participants, roughly half were from the private sector, with the rest representing government, academia, and nonprofit organizations. Videos and presentations for the event can be seen below. Read more →

Energy Storage Summit hosted by the Energy Transition Lab

July 22, 2015Megan ButlerNewsComments Off on Energy Storage Summit hosted by the Energy Transition Lab
Viewing posters featuring University of Minnesota Research during the Energy Storage Summit

Viewing posters featuring University of Minnesota Research during the Energy Storage Summit

The Energy Transition Lab held a summit on July 15 at which national and local experts examined the policy, technology, regulatory, and market drivers that affect energy storage in Minnesota. This story originally appeared on the University of Minnesota Law School website. Read more →

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Administration
The Energy Transition Lab is a strategic initiative of the University of Minnesota's Institute on the Environment in partnership with the Law School.
Funding
Funding for the Energy Transition Lab is primarily provided by the Institute on the Environment. Other funders include McKnight Foundation, Energy Foundation, Carolyn Foundation, US Department of Energy, Wind Energy Foundation and the University of California Berkeley Energy and Climate Institute. Support for energy storage work is provided by the Minneapolis Foundation, Great River Energy, Mortenson Construction, AES Corporation, Next Era Energy Resources, and General Electric. Funders have no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of any manuscript.